Western Pennsylvania Law Library Association

A chapter of the American Association of Law Libraries.


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June Links Roundup

Gmail’s Smart Compose will write emails for you Smart Compose, a feature now available in the new Gmail re-vamp, “suggests complete sentences in your emails so that you can draft them with ease.”

 

Use Google Scholar’s Advanced Search for Narrow Case Law Searching This Texas Tech Law Library’s blog post provides interesting “tricks” for getting the most out of Google Scholar, a free case law search tool. These tricks “will help you narrow your search results to relevant cases.”

 

From Slip Law to United States Code: A Guide to Federal Statutes for Congressional Staff A CRS Report released on May 2, 2018 “provides an overview of federal statutes in their various forms, as well as basic guidance for congressional staff interested in researching statutes.”

 

3 Easy Ways to Convert Webpages Into PDFs If you could convert a webpage into a .pdf, “you could read any webpage offline in no-internet zones, making it easy to read articles and other pages offline.” This blog post details three easy, user-friendly ways to complete such a task! (Now, we can take even more reading home with us when we leave the office each weekday!)

 

Guide to Gmail’s new ‘confidential mode’ According to Business Insider and beSpacific, “[c]onfidential mode is available to users with personal accounts who opted into the new version of Gmail last month, when Google announced the latest changes to its email application.”

 

How To Improve Pennsylvania’s Tax System As noted by a professor at George Mason University, “Pennsylvania ranks near the top in tax burden and near the bottom in business friendliness in the nation. While much good can be said about the state’s personal income tax rate and relatively low sales tax rate, Pennsylvania’s business taxes are in serious need of reform.” This blog post reflects on potential improvements.

 

New on LLRX – 2018 New Economy Resources and Tools Linked by beSpacific, this guide “provides researchers in multiple disciplines – law, economists, academia, government, corporate, and journalism – the latest, most reliable web resources for discovering sources to meet the multifaceted needs of time sensitive, specific, actionable work product.”

 

Paper – Cutting through the Fog: Government Information, Librarians, and the Forty-Fifth Presidency Reflecting on “an increasingly polarized electorate, concerns about ‘fake news,’ and a greater use of social media” as well as the Trump Administration’s utilization of “disintermediation of information consumption by communicating directly to the public and going around the ‘experts,'” this new book examines the impact on government information librarians especially  their concern “with the production, distribution, consumption, and preservation of government information, and impact the public’s understanding of—and trust in—government information.”

 

Public can now search UK government’s entire digital archive For the first time, “[t]he British government’s entire online presence comprising billions of web pages has been indexed and digitally archived to the cloud for the first time. Manchester tech firm MirrorWeb has devised an all-new indexing to create an accessible, searchable and user-friendly resource for the public.” This web archive collection is 120TB and includes every government department website and social media account from 1996 to the present.

 

  In a May 21, 2018 email, Rita Young shared her response from the Office of the Mayor of Philadelphia regarding the redistribution of civil filing fees (thus imperiling the Jenkins Law Library). The stinging message read, in part, “law libraries, including Jenkins, do not serve the same function today as they did years ago.”

 

CRS – False Statements and Perjury: An Overview of Federal Criminal Law The Mueller investigation’s interest in potentially investigating President Trump begs the question: “whether a sitting President, consistent with the separation of powers and Article II of the Constitution, may be required to comply with a subpoena for his testimony as part of an ongoing criminal investigation.”  This CRS Report goes into detail about the type of subpoena Mueller could issue and thoughtfully questions issues regarding separation of powers between the various branches of government.

 

INSTANTLY CREATE AND SHARE A BIBLIOGRAPHY WITH ZOTEROBIB – EVEN IN BLUEBOOK A helpful post from the WisBlawg (the University of Wisconsin’s Law Library Blog) recommends “Zotero,” “an incredibly powerful citation manager that helps you collect, organize, cite, and share research.” The site is open source (so it’s free!), “perfect for large research projects where you’re researching over a period of days, weeks, [or] months,” and supports multiple citation styles, including Bluebook. The post also includes info on other citation sites, including EasyBib and ZoteroBib.

 

New edition of Zotero: A Guide for Librarians, Researchers and Educators published by ACRL

 

Follow the links provided in this Law Librarian Blog post for a “thorough introduction to Zotero.”

 


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Library Postcards Collection @ the ALA Archives

The Sjoerd Koopman Library Postcard Collection at the University of Illinois’ ALA Archives Collection includes pictorial and photographic postcards of libraries throughout the United States and Europe. Subjects include public libraries, private libraries, academic libraries, library interiors, reading rooms, and bookmobiles. Carnegie Library Postcard

Currently, the collection contains 30 Pennsylvania libraries.

Check out our Carnegie Library circa 1910. Too bad they missed the ‘h’ in Pittsburgh!

Thanks to Sjoerd Koopman for letting us know about this fantastic collection!

 


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May Link Round Up

FDLP MODERNIZATION ACT OF 2018 WOULD ENSURE GREATER ACCESS TO GOVERNMENT INFORMATION The April 2018 AALL Washington EBulletin, forwarded by Joel Fishman, reviews the FLP Modernization Act of 2018 and provides a section-by-section analysis of the bill as well as information on how the GPO, Copyright Office, Congressional Research Service, and Library of Congress budgets will fare under the Omnibus spending bill.

 

Judge Declares Some PACER Fees Illegal but Does Not Go Far Enough On March 31, 2018, Judge Huvelle of the US District Court for the District of Columbia rules that approximately $200 million will likely be returned to people who paid PACER fees from 2010 to 2016. The author of the linked blog post believes that this is a first step towards determining that PACER fees are prohibitively expensive and/or unconstitutional – though Judge Huvelle does not approach that ideological decision in the opinion.

 

Can Law Librarian/Vendors Relations Ever Be a Win-Win Relationship Again? In a 3 Geeks and a Law Blog post forwarded by Joel Fishman (and linked within the email), the current AALL president muses on the current state of the relationship between “legal information providers (vendors) and legal information professionals (law librarians)” and how it’s going to change in the future.

 

Massive restructuring at the ABA will rehouse entities under 9 centers An announcement from the executive director of the ABA details a “major restructuring of the organization,” complete with the creation of nine new Centers falling under one of the four main goals of the ABA umbrella: “serving members; improving the profession; eliminating bias and enhancing diversity; and advancing the rule of law.” Read the article for a full list of the names and aims of the new Centers.

 

Why RSS Still Beats Facebook and Twitter for Tracking News RSS hasn’t gone away; according to a beSpacific link to a Gizmodo article, it’s “faster, more efficient, and you won’t have to worry as much about accidentally leaking your news reading habit to all your Facebook friends.”

 

“The Board will be gathering more facts in order to determine how to effectively respond” to LexisNexis’ tying ultimatum Read this post on the Law Librarian Blog for information on “recent LexisNexis tie-in attempts”: “the Company refuses to sell print or ancillary products in retaliation for cancelling Lexis Advance as if this may be a new company sales policy.”

 

CRS – Sexual Harassment and Title VII: Selected Legal Issues The CRS report, linked through beSpacific, to examine Supreme Court precedent addressing Title VII sexual harassment claims, the statutory interpretation and rationales reflected in these decisions, and examples of lower federal court decisions applying this precedent. The report also discusses various types of harassment recognized by the Supreme Court (such as “hostile work environment,” quid pro quo, constructive discharge, and same-sex harassment) as well as sexual harassment in the context of retaliation.

 

CRS – Statutory Interpretation: Theories, Tools, and Trends A link on beSpacific to a CRS paper explaining the tools judges use to gather evidence of statutory meaning.

 

An email forwarded by Cindy Cicco explains House Bill 1937: a proposal to divert court filing fees from funding the Jenkins Law Library to the First Judicial District’s general fund. The Philadelphia Bar Association is considering a resolution in support of this legislation. The message provides additional information to help concerned citizens oppose the Philadelphia Bar Associations potential resolution and the House Bill.

 

4 Ways to Deal With a Toxic Coworker If you’re having a rough day (or if someone in particular is really getting on your nerves), take a look at this Harvard Business Review study to identify toxic team members and come up with constructive ways to deal with him/her.

 

GPO COMPLETES DIGITIZING ALL ISSUES
OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER
In an April 11, 2018 Press Release, the U.S. Government Publishing Office announced it, along with the National Archives’ Office of the Federal Register have “digitized every issue of the Federal Register, dating back to the first one published in 1936. A total of 14,587 individual issues, which is nearly two million pages, has been digitized.” See the email forwarded by Joel Fishman for an attachment of the Press Release and the URL for the new home of the digitized works.

 

This is the new Gmail design Check out the new Gmail redesign before its implemented!

 

House Committee Markups: Manual of Procedures and Procedural Strategies A recently released CRS report “examines procedures and strategy related to committee markups and provides sample procedural scripts.”

 

GOODBYE FDSYS, HELLO GOVINFO This blog post notes (with unanticipated gusto, I might add) that sometime in late 2018, Fdsys will be officially and formally replaced by Govinfo. Read the full post to learn the differences and nuances between the two, and get ready for the switch.

 

New on LLRX – Can Legal Research Be Taught? Part 3: Pushing Ourselves Further Legal research experts conclude “to be the experts in legal research we must also be leaders in developing knowledge in our field, furthering the understanding of the legal domain and of our own place within it.”

 

Papers of Benjamin Franklin Now Online In an email forwarded by Joel Fishman, Benjamin Franklin’s papers are now posted online. Visit the Library of Congress’ website to peruse at your leisure!

 

First Draft and fake news Forwarded by Joel Fishman, this email links to a project from the Harvard Kennedy School’s Shorenstein Center; it includes a PDF download of A Field Guide to Fake News and Other Information Disorders and a free online course to help readers better identify misinformation.

 

Navigating through Wikipedia articles on desktop just got a lot easier The new “page previews” feature allows users to get a quick grasp of what’s behind a link without committing to a click-through.

 

Five Books To Help You Be More Productive And Organized Tips, tricks, and newfangled apps only go so far. For more detailed info on organization and productivity, check out the books listed in this Fast Company article.

 

Points of Law Wins 2018 AALL New Product Award Excerpted from the beSpacific blog post:
“The American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) has named Points of Law as its 2018 New Product Award winner. Introduced in 2016 using artificial intelligence and machine learning to assist in legal research, Points of Law is a product of Bloomberg Law. Points of Law allows users to quickly identify and analyze language in a judicial opinion. The product adds a layer of automated indexing to its 1 3 million—and counting—library of published and unpublished state and federal court opinions to provide users with a decision’s legal points and identify legal precedents. In addition, researchers can conduct keyword searches across all case law or specific jurisdictions within the content library.”
Library of Congress Posts U.S. Supreme Court Cases collection The Library of Congress has posted “more than 225 years of decisions” and this beSpacific blog post also links to other helpful sites where a reader can translate citations from a nominative reporter to a volume of the U.S. Report.

 

 


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March Link Roundup

Librarians digitally archive rare White House images According to news alerts from the ALA and CNN, a “team of librarians working for the White House Historical Association have been digitizing archives of uncatalogued slides from White House history, most of which haven’t been accessible by the public before now.” If you spot something you want for your home or office, you can buy high-resolution images or download them for free at a lower resolution.
Classified Presidential Library Records to be Moved to DC In a press release from the National Archives, approximately 75 million pages of classified records housed at presidential libraries across the U.S. will be gathered and moved to Washington, D.C. for declassification review.
Citizen Archivist Missions The National Archives has curated a list of transcription/tagging volunteer projects. See the post and follow the links to check out topics that interest you, and you can start helping ASAP!
  WPLLA member Joel Fishman forwarded an email and listpost describing a new infrastructure service being spearheaded by digital preservationists at Yale University Library; it will “resurrect thousands of obsolete software programs and ensure that the information produced on them will be kept intact and made easily available for future access, study, and use.”

For more info, see the blog post here.

Ambrogi – In New Ethics Ruling On Blogging, ABA Opines Like It’s 1999 The American Bar Association published Formal Opinion 480 regarding “the ethics obligations around the ‘newest format’ in online publishing by lawyers, blogs, as well as listservs, online articles, website postings, and ‘brief online statements or microblogs’ such as Twitter.” Does this opinion cement the ABA’s reputation as being “behind the curve on technology issues?”
Law Library of Congress digitally releases U.S. Reports from 1791 to 2004 “The Law Library of Congress . . . released digital copies of the printed bound volumes of the United States Reports from 1791 to 2004, making more than 35,000 Supreme Court cases available for the first time online as page images in a searchable format.”
Exploring Pennsylvania’s Gerrymandered Congressional Districts In an email from WPLLA member Pat Roncevich, a blog post with a more detailed “expert witness spatial analysis” about Pennsylvania’s gerrymandered election districts.
Introduced Legislation to Amend Title 44, U.S.C. In an email from WPLLA member Pat Roncevich, a link to the Federal Depository Library Program’s posting of the full text for the FDLP Modernization Act of 2018 to amend Title 44 of the U.S. Code.
  In an email from WPLLA member Joel Fishman, govinfo.gov posted a new series of “Precedents of the U.S. House of Representatives (2017).
How to Locate the Bills and Amendments a Member of Congress has Sponsored or Cosponsored in Congress.gov Cross-posted from Custodia Legis – “One of the questions we are frequently asked is how to locate a bill or amendment that a member of Congress has sponsored or cosponsored. There are a few ways to do this on Congress.gov…”
The Academic Law Library in the Age of Affiliations: A Case Study of the University of New Hampshire Law Library beSpacific linked to an article published in the Law Library Journal, which studies the University of New Hampshire Law Library’s recent affiliation with another law school.
AALL partners with Perma.cc to ensure unbroken links to association publications AALL announced a partnership with Perma.cc; this will ensure AALL publications remain complete and maintain their longevity for the benefit of its more than 4,500 members.
GPO Statement On H.R. 5305, The FDLP Modernization Act Of 2018 Recently-introduced H.R. 5305 (the FDLP Modernization Act of 2018) is a bipartisan bill cosponsored by all other members of the Committee to reform the Federal Depository Library Program (FDLP). “The bill affirms the principle that the free flow of Government information is fundamental to the health of our democracy, and acknowledges the important role Federal depository libraries play in ensuring free public access to that information.”
New Linked Citations in the Congressional Record Index New editions of the Congressional Record Index will hyperlink citations in the text file for bills and pages in the Congressional Record to the  corresponding document in govinfo. This beSpacific blog post also links to the current and previous editions of the Congressional Record Index.
CRS Reports in Scope of the FDLP The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2018 includes a provision titled, “Equal Access to Congressional Research Service Reports,” which directs the Congressional Research Service (CRS) to make non-confidential CRS Reports freely-available to the public.

The Federal Depository Library Program notes “Historically, distribution of CRS Reports was limited to Members of Congress. They were not considered in the public domain, and therefore, CRS Reports were out of scope of the Federal Depository Library Program (FDLP). Once CRS Reports begin to be publicly-disseminated, these reports will be in scope of the FDLP. “

 


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Save the Date: 40th Anniversary Banquet 5/10/18

2018-04-19_11-23-42

COME CELEBRATE WITH US!

40th Anniversary – Western Pennsylvania Law Libraries Association

What: WPLLA history, member reminiscences, trivia contest, and music by Anthony Cicco

When: Thursday May 10th – 5:30 pm until 8:00 pm

Where: University Club Gold Room, 123 University Place (Oakland)

How much: $20 (includes Taste of Tuscany Dinner Buffet) – payment accepted at the door

Please RSVP to: Melanie Cline